Investigating the Role of Short-chain Fatty Acid Butyrate on Anxiety-like Behavior and Social Recognition in Mice

Conference: The Asian Undergraduate Research Symposium (AURS2021)
Title: Investigating the Role of Short-chain Fatty Acid Butyrate on Anxiety-like Behavior and Social Recognition in Mice
Stream: Science, Technology, Engineering & Math
Presentation Type: Virtual Poster Presentation
Authors:
Tzu-Hsuan Yao, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
Wei-Li Wu, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
Chia-Wei Liou, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

Abstract:

The microbiota-gut-brain axis is a concept describing the complicated interactions among gut microbiota, intestinal microenvironment, and central nervous system. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling from the gut microbes can directly or indirectly impact brain development and functionalities through immune, neural, hormonal, or metabolic pathways. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are metabolites derived from intestinal microbial fermentation of dietary fibers and resistant starch and play a critical role in the host nervous system. Among the various SCFA, previous studies suggest that butyrate exerts beneficial effects on neurodevelopmental disorders and cognitive dysfunction. However, most studies focused on the peripheral effects of butyrate on behaviors. Herein, we examined the effects of central infusion of butyrate on anxiety-like and social recognition in mice. Butyrate was infused into the brain by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection in mice treated with antibiotics. The data showed that ICV injection of butyrate did not produce any effect on anxiety-like behavior and social recognition in antibiotics-treated mice. However, we found that central infusion of butyrate downregulated the locomotor activity in the open-field test. In addition, our preliminary data showed that ICV injection of butyrate increased c-Fos+ cells in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Altogether, central delivery of butyrate in the acute fashion decreases the locomotion but does not alter mouse anxiety-like and social recognition. We speculate that the lowered locomotion in central butyrate-infused mice might be associated with the neural activity in distinct brain regions in the limbic system, such as PVN and CeA.




Virtual Poster Presentation

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